Citizen Journalism

Archive for the ‘Jane Cattermole’ Category

Refugees tell @latingle how they would change our policy and practice

In Immigration, Jane Cattermole, Refugees on March 5, 2013 at 2:13 PM

photo (3)

By Jane Cattermole
March 5, 2013

I recently attended the Perth Writer’s Festival and heard heard refugees tell their own stories and describe the mistrust and bitterness they felt from some Australians. Laura Tingle moderated the forum on ‘Refugees: Where do they come from?’ and the panel was:

Robin de Crespigny, Author of The People Smuggler and winner of the 25th Human Rights Award for Literature

Kooshyar Karimi, Refugee, Author of I Confess: Revelations in Exile and General Practitioner

Carina Hoang, Refugee, Author of Boat People: Personal Stories from the Vietnamese Exodus and a Special Representative of Australia for UNHCR

Robin’s book tells the true story of Ali Al Jenabi, who fled Saddam Hussain’s torture chambers and became a people smuggler to get his family to safety. He became known as the Oskar Schindler of Asia.

Kooshyar’s story began in the post-revolutionary bloodshed of the Iran-Iraq war. He practised medicine and helped desperate women and girls who had been raped terminate their resulting pregnancies. He was kidnapped and tortured over 65 days and then had to spy on his own people or be slowly tortured to death. He smuggled his wife and children out of Iran into Turkey where he hid for more than a year before the UNHCR granted him refugee status. He now lives in Sydney and works as a GP near Newcastle.

Carina was the eldest of seven children living in Saigon during the Vietnam war. After four years living under communist rule and not knowing the whereabouts of her father, Carina, still a teenager, set out for a new life with her younger brother and sister. They had seven gruelling days at sea, ran out of food and saw people die, were attacked by pirates and tossed around by violent storms. They landed in Indonesia and taken by authorities to an uninhabited island where they lived for a year. Carina was finally granted refugee status and lived in America before settling in Australia with her husband and daughter.

As you can imagine their stories of persecution, war, torture and escape were harrowing, but I will focus on their responses to these questions from Laura:

We have a federal election coming up. If there was one thing you could get changed about refugee policy in Australia what would it be? Would it just be increasing the humanitarian intake? Also there are questions about processing and all that sort of stuff, or would it be onshore versus offshore. What would be the one thing, that if a politician was actually going to be brave in this debate, what would you like to see them do?

photo (2)

Read the rest of this entry »

Advertisements

Laura Tingle reveals why some policies don’t get covered any more

In Jane Cattermole, MSM, Refugees on February 23, 2013 at 9:00 PM
4061762-16x9-512x288

Laura Tingle

By Jane Cattermole
February 23, 2013

On Friday I attended a forum at the Perth Writers Festival titled Refugees; where do they come from. The speakers were Robin de Crespigny, author of  ‘The People Smuggler’, Kooshyar Karimi, refugee and author of ‘I Confess: Revelations in Exile’ and Carina Hoang, author of ‘Boat People: Personal Stories from the Vietnamese Exodus’. The forum was convened by Laura Tingle from the Australian Financial Review. After the presentations and discussion there was time for a couple of questions. Here’s one asked of Laura, and her reply.
Question:
Don’t you feel that the media has a much greater responsibility to act rather than to simply mouth what is the party line? You’re in a privileged position where you can speak with a far greater volume than most of us, so I would like to ask you, why doesn’t that happen? Who’s stopping you from speaking out? Why won’t more journalists have the courage of our convictions?

Laura Tingle answer:
image

Right!

This is a complex question which I’m trying to answer very seriously and successfully, and we’ll also be having a discussion about media tomorrow.

A few things have happened. One of them is the way the political debate in Australia is reported has changed dramatically over the last ten or fifteen years in particular. We used to have people who wrote about immigration and refugees and asylum seeker policy. We used to have people who were health policy experts.

I work in Canberra and this is what I can tell you about best. The change in the economics of the media and the change in the way the media works means that we no longer have specialists in those areas anymore. Now that sounds like a really small thing but it means that when a story is reported it’s reported by generalist reporters.

In Canberra we’re political reporters and we tend to report it, and I’m using the Royal We here. I’ll take responsibility for the sins that are mine and that aren’t. We report it as a political story, as a matter of political controversy. There aren’t people in the key offices of the newspapers who would have written really detailed, well informed pieces backgrounding these issues, but that’s a sweeping generalisation. The guy who won the Gold Walkley in December was Steve Penros from The West Australian and he wrote about the Christmas Island tragedy – but it is now a rare thing that it happens.

Now the Financial Review, which isn’t your mainstream Refugee policy paper I fairly concede, but we actually had a period, and this shows you how these things happen, where there are a whole heap of issues which the editor, the previous editor, there were a range of issues that business was just not interested in.

Refugees was certainly one of them. Climate change was another, and we literally couldn’t get them into the paper. That extended to immigration generally, which was I thought was, well, a bit stupid because, you know, it’s the labour market. Read the rest of this entry »

Questions for Mr Pyne

In Ashby Conspiracy, Guest Author, Jane Cattermole, Margo Kingston, Tony The Geek on February 3, 2013 at 11:29 AM

art-pyne-620x349

  1. Mr Pyne, do you condone the theft of diaries from MPs? If not what action should be taken against people who request & receive stolen goods?
  2. What is your attitude to stealing the diary of an MP & giving it to his rivals?
  3. What is your attitude to someone receiving stolen property? Particularly if they confess to so doing?
  4. Do you support abusing the process of the Court?
  5. Do you believe being named in Federal Court indicating abuse of process warrants full and open press appearance?
  6. Mr Pyne, WTF do you mean by ‘no specific knowledge’? https://soundcloud.com/geeksrulz/pyne-plays-games
  7. As LOTO, why didn’t Tony Abbott intitiate thorough investigation of serious rumours surrounding Mr Slipper?
  8. Why don’t you release your publicly funded transcripts of recent doorstops?
  9. Why does Abbott falsely claim that Brough has ‘been very upfront about his dealings with James Ashby’?
  10. Why did you say on Lateline that Mr Brough is contesting the Rares findings when he’s not & is it a ploy to avoid ?
  11. You’ve stated that on March 19 you drank with James Ashby and had “political discussion”; What was discussed?
  12. Pyne, you have repeatedly said this is a contest about trust. So why don’t you & Mr Abbott front the media & answer questions on Ashby?
  13. Do you condone Tony Abbott turning his back on journalists asking questions about the Ashby Brough Affair?
  14. You demanded the resignation of Mr Slipper over private SMS’s with Mr Ashby; will you release all your emails/SMS’s to or from Mr Ashby?

 

https://twitter.com/margokingston1/status/298046939759525888

 

These questions were crowdsourced from a number of people on Twitter who contributed to a request by Margo Kingston. They were all collated in this Storify post. A great thank you to all for their combined efforts.

[View the story “Christoper Pyne Questions on Ashbygate” on Storify]

Additional information

Abbott Questions

Brough Questions

Did Mr Pyne stay or leave the room?

In Ashby Conspiracy, Jane Cattermole, Margo Kingston, Tony The Geek on February 3, 2013 at 10:07 AM
Mr Pyne doorstop Adelaide February 3, 2013
Today the Prime Minister has serious questions to answer about how she intends to govern for the next seven months with what is clearly an unravelling government. The Prime Minister needs to confirm whether by elections will be held in the normal course of events, say within two to three months of a resignation and not held off til September in order to keep the Prime Minister’s tenuous hold on power in place. We know that we’ve had the resignations of Nicola Roxon and Chris Evans. We know that Peter Slipper and Craig Thomson are under a legal cloud. Robert McClennand has announced his retirement and has said he’ll be applying for jobs that will take him out of the parliament. There are rumours of other Labor MP’s and frontbenchers to follow and the Prime Minister is leaving very vague whether she will pursue the normal course of events which is by elections within one, two or at most three months of  resignations or whether she’ll hold those off until September 14th election date. That’s not good enough for the Australian public.

This government is starting to resemble a scene from “Downfall” and  the Prime  Minister is presiding over a divided and dysfunctional government.
The Coalition on the other hand has a plan for all for a safe, secure Australia and a strong and prosperous Australia.

We want the government to get it’s act together because if this wasn’t so serious it would be funny. 

Did Mr Pyne stay or leave the room?

Jane Cattermole asks: Why a different rule for Peter Slipper?

In Ashby Conspiracy, Jane Cattermole on January 15, 2013 at 11:57 AM

By Jane Cattermole
15th January 2013

Peter-Slipper-420x0

Peter Slipper, for the latter part of his parliamentary career was much maligned and ridiculed by colleagues and members of the media alike. He was called a “turncoat”, a “rat”, ”Slippery” and was portrayed as “King Rat” on the front of a News Ltd tabloid complete with a digitally altered image of him with whiskers and a rat’s tail, and mockingly, dressed in a wig and gown.

Despite the relentless gossip about his private life and the constant trashing of his reputation he took to high office impressively and most would agree that he was an exemplary Speaker. He showed fear and favour to no one, he ejected senior politicians from the House and told the PM on more than one occasion to confine herself to questions of relevance.

It’s a matter of history now that Slipper was accused of sexual harassment by James Ashby and that the titillating details of their private text messages were splashed all over the daily newspapers. They were talked about ad nauseam on commercial TV, radio, SKY News and our ABC alike. Tony Abbott was so sure of its implications for the Speaker and government that within hours of charges being laid he was announcing that it was untenable that an MP facing such serious allegations should hold such a senior position in the parliament. Not content to let the court do its job he was relentlessly pursued by the Coalition who moved to have him removed as Speaker. He survived the vote in the House but with his reputation in tatters, and his political career in ruins he resigned in tears. Read the rest of this entry »