Citizen Journalism

Posts Tagged ‘Malcolm Turnbull’

Beware Turnbull’s Triple NBN Tax – your hidden out-of-pocket expenses

In Federal Election, NBN, Steve Jenkin on May 16, 2013 at 6:33 PM

By Steve Jenkin

May 16,  2013

Source: http://stevej-on-it.blogspot.com.au/

The Coalition has been very silent on one of its biggest and most invasive change to the NBN:

Every DSL-NBN subscriber is going to be saddled with three unavoidable out-of-pocket expenses. All in-house cabling changes have to be done by a registered cabler, it’s NOT DIY. You may go on e-Bay and buy a $50 VDSL modem, but it won’t work.

  1. Install a VDSL Central Splitter and new VDSL modem to get advertised speed. [$250-$500]
  2. When, not if, the copper phone service is turned off or you need a second line, install an NTD (Network Termination Device) as supplied “for free” for FTTP uses. The NTD contains two voice service connectors (via an internal “ATA”) and four data service connectors. [$500-$1,500]
  3. Either because you want a better service or when the DSL network is turned off in, say, 2022, you’ll pay to have Fibre run to your home. Charges by BT in the UK, whom it seems Turnbull is modelling his network upon, start at $1,250 and max-out at $10,000. That’s not a cap, they just won’t go further.

Step 1. Get VDSL working

The Coalition are saving a small amount, 5%-10%, in NBN construction costs of the NBN by forcing unavoidable costs onto householders. And not once, but three times, will ordinary householders have forced and avoidable out-of-pocket expenses. What’s not to like?

When a node is installed on your line, it will be “without disruption”. Your phone will still work, and given that your ISP can and will transfer your ADSL service from their exchange DSLAM to the node, your ADSL service will keep working.

Those nodes don’t just have ~150 DSL ports, they must also have ~200 phone ports, each with a filter that works for the two different ADSL and VDSL frequencies and a second internal distribution frame or patch panel. This makes them much larger, more expensive, and more complex than they need to be. More like the double-wide refrigerators that are Telstra RIM’s (with “Top Hat” conversions) than the very modest small-beige boxes of TransACT/iiNet in Canberra.

Not only are they forcing additional costs onto subscribers, they are increasing the cost & complexity (read “less reliable”) of the nodes. They could just follow the lead of the GPON FTTP rollout and provide an NTD and massively simplify the nodes and supporting network, but in the world of upside-down economics, a lower total cost doesn’t interest the Coalition.

If you want the advertised speed, you have to purchase a VDSL2 modem. Mr Turnbull has claimed they are “$50”, but not any brand-name models and nothing in the retail shops where you can get a least a modicum of pre-sales support and post-sales service and warranty. Perhaps if you bought 1,000 directly from overseas, they’d cost you $50. Looking at British sites, I see them in the $150-$250 range.

But it won’t work when you plug it in!

ADSL and VDSL operate with different frequencies and require different “splitters”. To get reliable service – nothing special, but just what’s been advertised and you’ve paid for – your best option is to install a “Central Splitter”. If you attempt to run “in-line” splitters, they are very likely to go awry and you’ll lose your service.

The Telco phone line into your house is cut and the “splitter” is connected before the first phone point. The splitter has two output connections: one for the DSL modem, the other for the phones in your house.

The cable up to and including the first phone point is the responsibility of the Telco. Only registered cablers are allowed to touch it, with some pretty draconian legislation applying to “line tampering”. Read the rest of this entry »

@NoFibs NBN policy articles curated by citizen journo @pascalg15

In NBN, Pascale Grosvenor, Telecommunications on April 11, 2013 at 4:44 PM
Credit: Malcolm Turnbull Facebook - Spoof by The Geek

Credit: Malcolm Turnbull Facebook – Spoof by The Geek

By Pascal Grosvenor
April 11, 2013

With all the claims and counter claims going back and forth via Twitter or Facebook I’ve been getting frustrated,because there’s lots of incorrect facts and sometimes outright lies being perpetrated. People on both sides of the political debate have been guilty of this.

My goal is to collate the articles I’ve read about the NBN Co’s FTTH or the LNP’s FTTN alternative in one place. I’ll regularly update this list.

FTTH is Fibre to the Home (sometimes referred to as FTTP or Fibre to the Premise)

FTTN is Fibre to the Node (the Telstra junction box at the end of the street)

I hope people find this useful.  I include articles from both sides of the debate – please post comments or suggestions for extra articles to include.  I won’t accept anything from the ALP or Liberal party websites or from politicians for obvious reasons.

Please post your comments or suggestions for extra articles to include.New links added 18/4/13 – they’re highlighted in yellow.

Disclaimer : I’m personally in favour of the ALP’s NBN. I think it’s the best option.

Note re Comments : Any comments with swearing or personal abuse of me (or anyone else) will not be approved. Play the ball not the person …

Technical/ IT based blog posts :

Credibility And The Alternate NBN (by @mwyres)
http://michaelwyres.com/2013/04/credibility-and-the-alternate-nbn/

Not All Technology Is Equal (by @sortius) http://sortius-is-a-geek.com/?p=2883

Coalitions NBN plan to stop consumers taking control of media (by @sortius)

Why not FTTN ? NBN Myths (comparing FTTN speeds) http://nbnmyths.wordpress.com/why-not-fttn/

Coalition’s NBN plan: where’s the cost of the copper? http://www.theregister.co.uk/2013/04/14/coalition_broadband_plan/

@sortius on how and why the Coalition’s NBN policy is designed to fail (australiansforhonestpolitics.wordpress.com)

Comments by ex Telstra linesman http://fibreorcopper.wordpress.com/2013/04/14/broadband-user-experiences/#comment-2

Articles in favor of FTTN :

Why the Coalition’s NBN plan makes sense http://www.smh.com.au/it-pro/government-it/why-the-coalitions-nbn-plan-makes-sense-20130410-2hkx2.html

Broadband utopia is a pipedream: analyst
http://www.smh.com.au/it-pro/government-it/broadband-utopia-is-a-pipedream-analyst-20130411-2hnl8.html#

Turnbull has saved the NBN http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/4/10/infrastructure/turnbull-has-saved-nbn

The case against /problems with FTTN – told by photos :

Worst of the worst: Photos of Australia’s copper network http://delimiter.com.au/2012/05/01/worst-of-the-worst-photos-of-australias-copper-network/

Some more articles :

#Fraudband is an #NBN fail, even for punters By Stephen Neate

A tale of two NBNs: the Coalition’s broadband policy explained http://theconversation.com/a-tale-of-two-nbns-the-coalitions-broadband-policy-explained-13304

News articles & opinion pieces from mainstream media :

The Coalition’s NBN policy is a triumph of short-termism over long-term vision (pcauthority.com.au)

NBN $17b cheaper, but slower (smh.com.au)

Coalition NBN Policy: Six Things To Think About (gizmodo.com.au)

Coalition’s NBN alternative bad for regional Australia : says telco expert http://www.sunshinecoastdaily.com.au/news/coalitions-nbn-alternative-bad-regional-aus/1823370/ …

NBN debate full of ‘erroneous’ information http://www.smh.com.au/it-pro/government-it/nbn-debate-full-of-erroneous-information-20130404-2h8m9.html

Telstra will decide Coalition’s NBN: Hackett http://www.zdnet.com/au/telstra-will-decide-coalitions-nbn-hackett-7000013724/

Personal accounts of people now using the NBN :
(or who want to be on the NBN asap)

Imagining an amazing innovative future with Labor’s NBN
https://australiansforhonestpolitics.wordpress.com/2013/04/14/imagining-an-amazing-innovative-future-with-labors-nbn

Jack McCaw’s NBN story
https://australiansforhonestpolitics.wordpress.com/2013/03/03/jack-mccaws-nbn-story/

We are now connected to the NBN. Here’s a run-down on the install. And the speed!
http://alankerlin.blogspot.com.au/2013/04/we-are-now-connected-to-nbn-heres-run.html

Pass or fail? Kiama mum grades the NBN
http://www.illawarramercury.com.au/story/1356891/pass-or-fail-kiama-mum-grades-the-nbn/?cs=12

Why Jake’s impatient for the NBN
https://australiansforhonestpolitics.wordpress.com/2013/04/02/why-jakes-impatient-for-the-nbn/

Examples of other countries deploying FTTH :

Benefits of Ultra-Fast Broadband http://ufb.org.nz/benefits/

Japan launches world’s fastest home internet 2Gbps : http://www.smh.com.au/technology/technology-news/japan-launches-worlds-fastest-home-internet-20130416-2hxge.html

Taking on Provo, Utah failure proves Google is serious about FTTH http://www.tellusventure.com/blog/taking-on-provo-failure-proves-google-is-serious-about-ftth/

France Telecom strikes FTTH network pact with Bouygues Telecom http://www.fiercetelecom.com/story/france-telecom-strikes-ftth-network-pact-bouygues-telecom/2012-01-17#ixzz2QnW70ZIF

Coalition’s NBN plan to stop consumers taking control of media

In Kieran Cummings, NBN, Telecommunications on April 9, 2013 at 3:40 PM

skynews_861870

By Kieran Cummings (@sortius)

April 9th, 2013

The Coalition held its broadband policy launch at, wait for it, Murdoch’s Fox Sports, And the press secretary handed out copies of Murdoch’s Daily Telegraph instead of policy documents. Guess what the final outcome of Malcolm Turnbull’s broadband plan will be. The policy debate will heat up over the coming months because there are massive amounts of detail missing from the policy.

Turnbull was combative, if not outright belligerent. From the outset he was unable to give details on even the basics of his policy in answer to questions such as ‘How long will the copper last?’.

I had thought that finally Turnbull would release a policy filled with cogent arguments and factual information, but this was not to be so. Instead the press conference was laced with misinformation, leaving me feeling underwhelmed and annoyed. Details are even more scant in the press release offered up by www.liberal.org.au. Most of the document is merely an attack on the current NBN and vague figures like ‘estimated $90b’ & ‘up to 100Mbps’. There’s no real meat in this policy, and the oft quoted ‘background documents’ are non-existent.

So because I can’t do deep policy analysis I have to go with this policy being a Claytons policy – lots of words, but nothing to say. The best any journalist can do is look at the assumptions and see how out of kilter with reality they are.

There are no details on the future plans of the Coalition or on what will happen to NBN Co once the build is completed. Unfortunately for Turnbull, Tony Abbott played his hand early, stating unequivocally that an LNP government would sell off the NBN. No details as to whether they would uphold the legislation that ensures NBN Co remain a wholesale-only company and be required to foster innovation and competition.

If anything, the build and sale planned, to deploy VDSL via FTTN, would stifle innovation and quash competition within the network. With Vectored VDSL, as Turnbull keeps stating will be deployed (but not mentioned once in the policy document), competition is incompatible. You cannot run multiple ISP’s vectored services via the same cable.

The next thing to look at is the LNP’s build estimates. Unfortunately there is no data to support the costs given, however there seems to be a large amount of information missing on ongoing maintenance costs, power consumption costs for running the cabinets and the cost of acquiring Telstra’s copper network. All of these together would seem to wipe out any reduction in the $40b-odd an FTTP deployment is estimated to cost.

There is no way the Coalition are anywhere near the mark with their $90b estimate to build FTTP, especially since even they have even said it would cost ‘several thousand dollars’ per user to run FTTP from a node. If we look at the BT example of FTTP upgrades and extrapolate an average user being charged ad-hoc rates close to $7000 per premises, it will cost users approximately $65b to upgrade all services. Seeing NBN Co is not charged ad-hoc rates, this cost would be far lower (closer to $30b for an end-to-end fibre service). So the savings from the Coalition are merely offloading costs from off-budget financing to end-user financing.

The main question is who benefits from the savings? It’s certainly not end-users. It’s certainly not businesses. It’s most certainly not retail service providers. The people who benefit will be the people who buy the network.

So who could possibly buy the network? Optus, iiNet, or even Vodafone? The three might be able to handle such a big fixed line network; however they do not have the technicians to maintain the copper. The only player capable of handling such a network is Telstra as they already have technicians and contracts with third parties to maintain the network.

So the end result would be Telstra selling their copper to NBN Co for an inflated price then buying it all back at a discount price, as no other company would want to take on such a liability as $1b per year in maintenance costs to run the copper network.

The fact that Murdoch’s subsidiaries have been so involved in this policy release betrays who is calling the shots. It’s not Turnbull (or as Abbott named him, Mr Broadband), nor is it Abbott. It’s clear that Murdoch’s media empire does not want FTTP – just read any of their papers on any given day to see the utter contempt for NBN Co in any article on the NBN.

The bottom line is that this is all about control. With FTTP the control is in the hands of consumers, giving them an opportunity to utilise Over-The-Top (OTT) services and remove the need for Foxtel if they wish to watch pay TV services.

With FTTN the need for satellite dishes and coaxial cable connections is vital to maintain internet speed while watching pay TV. Turnbull’s claim that VDSL is capable of carrying HD streams is myopic at best, as he ignores the technological advancements in broadcast systems such as the soon-to-be-released 4K broadcast standard.

@jtwyman John Twyman Speed difference between the #NBN & the Opposition's #fraudband proposal

@jtwyman John Twyman Speed difference between the #NBN & the Opposition’s #fraudband proposal

Even the most compressed 4K video requires at least 20Mbps of bandwidth, so the Coalition’s plans for a minimum of 25Mbps is severely lacking after network overheads are taken into account. The only way users on FTTN will receive 4K video is to utilise a dedicated connection to pay TV providers, meaning OTT providers are left out in the cold.

Essentially this policy ignores future needs of Australian consumers and business in favour of end-of-life technologies. Utilising such technologies ensures the control of media in Australia is maintained by the likes of Murdoch and his ilk.

If voters can take anything away from today’s policy announcement it’s this: the Coalition do not want to see Australia’s telecommunication network progress, but merely want to waste $30b delivering what’s there now to sell it off to the people who screwed up the network in the first place.

Read More:

Why Murdoch’s media is gunning for your NBN

Jack McCaw’s NBN story

Why Jake’s impatient for the NBN

Media despots, tsars and henchmen bury media reform

In Democracy, Fairfax, Freedom of Speech, Journalism, MSM, News Limited, Noely Neate on March 13, 2013 at 11:52 AM
Daily Telegraph Front Page March 13 2013

Daily Telegraph Front Page March 13 2013

By Noely Nate
March 13, 2013
OMG! Australian Media Reform means the sky falling in, freedom of the press under attack, the Government trying to gag the media.  Growing anger at ‘Soviet’ media reforms, Gillard’s Henchman Attacks Our Freedom (great Mao photoshop on that one). My personal favourite is Press tsar to check standards from The Australian, our supposedly pre-eminent National paper.  Hell, even Blind Freddy can see the theme here.

I thought the hyperventilation on Sky News and ABC24 yesterday afternoon was bad enough, but no, the News Limited papers seriously out-did themselves this morning.  I have spent the last few hours toiling away reading all the opinions on the ‘Threat to our Democracy’ that media reform is and so far, to my great shame as an Australian citizen, I have only found one article that actually acknowledged that these changes are aimed at giving Australians the diversity of news & media that they deserve.

Commando Conroy’s roll of the dice – of course the main thrust of Ms Murphy’s opinion is the ‘desperation of the Labor Government’, though I did find this gem below which tosses the ignorant punter a crumb of respect:

‘Making sure Australia’s currently woeful level of media diversity doesn’t get worse, and journalists conform with their own avowed professional standards are, after all, worthy public policy objectives in this country – uncontentious to anyone outside the industry.’

I know if you read the papers you might have missed this very salient point, but these reforms are actually supposed to help us – the customer, voter, citizen, the distracted masses outside of the seats of power who actually rely on the media to inform us.

The vast majority of the public still get their information from the mainstream media, not social media as Malcolm Turnbull maintains.  He also maintains that the public can ‘discern where truth lies’. I suggest that they cannot. Given full information from the media yes they could, though when it is the media themselves deciding what they will or will not tell the Australian public, we poor punters have no idea what the truth is at all.

The sad state of the likes of Meet The Press is a perfect example. The re-vamped version is produced by News Limited using News Limited resources and staff. The title is perilously close to false advertising because you are not meeting the press, you are meeting the News Limited press. Anyone else see an issue with this?

The great unwashed are, in general, blissfully unaware of the fact we really do not have any diversity of media in this country.  Looking at Queensland alone, punters are amazed when they find out that ONE company owns or has an interest in The Australian (our major national paper), The Courier Mail (our only state-wide paper) and Foxtel (popular in regional Qld due to poor TV reception)./ Even the NRL does not escape the News Ltd clutches. How can any one person with even the smallest dose of common-sense think that ONE person owning that much power to influence the public is a good thing?
“There is a reason that the charming Mr John Birmingham refers to this company as “News Ltd Death Star”, the pop culture reference is extremely apt.”

Murdoch apology front page on #NOTW

Murdoch apology front page on News of the World

Would we think that having one company supplying 75% of food to the nation as a good thing? Basically News Ltd rules our media. There is also Fairfax. The average person on the street is already cranky about the Coles Woolworths duopoly, so why the hell do the media think that only having two main players in the print media sector is ok and not being abused? Read the rest of this entry »

Are journos about truth or reporting what they say?

In ABC, John Faine Affair, Journalism, MSM, NBN, Peter Clarke on March 11, 2013 at 7:33 PM
Malcolm Turnbull - Surrealist Artist Installation Staged At Bondi Beach

Malcolm Turnbull – Surrealist Artist Installation Staged At Bondi Beach

By Peter Clarke
March 11, 2013

Margo: My first journalism job was at The Courier Mail. One day I wrote a story about a disagreement in the Queensland National Liberal Coalition Cabinet about condom vending machines. My first paragraph quoted the then health minister  Mike Ahern. My second said that his statement contradicted another minister, Lyne Powell. The chief sub editor, Graham Earle, called me over to demand an explanation for my story. ‘What is this?” he asked. ‘The truth,’ I replied. ‘Your job is not to write the truth, your job is to write what people say.”

I was devastated.

I was relieved when Fairfax’s the Times on Sunday, successor to the National Times, offered me a job as its Queensland reporter. Truth was what counted for Fairfax then. I felt honoured to work for them

Still, I encountered variations on the theme there too, particularly when I covered the Australian Broadcasting Tribunal re-hearings into Alan Bond’s bribe to Sir Joh to pay him $400,000 to settle a defamation claim in exchange for, well, you know, the ability to do business in Queensland.

I was steeped in the first hearing, and during the second reported when the evidence diverged from the first hearing. Again, I was told, your job is to write what people say. I fought that view, and won.

So this is a recurring theme in journalism.

In Canberra I was aggressive in press conferences, and back in Sydney I was aggressive too. I remember one occasion when I was writing stories on how it was imperative for developer donations to be disclosed in NSW. I went to a Bob Carr press conference on the Bali Bombings, where I questioned the Premier on the matter, to be met with false allegations that I had condoned the bombings.

The then news editor, Mark Coulton, complained to the editor of smh.com.au, for whom I worked, that it was unacceptable to press the Premier so hard, to be so ‘aggressive’. So I posted the audio and asked for comment. The majority of readers backed me.

Is our job to report what people say or to search for the truth?  And if it is the former, does journalism serve a useful purpose in our democracy?

*

Examining over the last few weeks the intricacies of the Jon Faine affair, has been fascinating. I have encountered so many differing perceptions, views, narratives, claims, assertions around the original Faine broadcast interviews and the unruly notions of ‘factual’, ‘balance’, ‘impartial’, ‘accuracy’, ‘argumentative’ and, yes, the biggie, TRUTH.

Then, there have also been claimed ‘bias breach’ and process attributes such as ‘consistent’ and ‘proportionate’.

Most of these encounters, but not all, have been with news media professionals or the executives within the ABC whose job it is to hold the line and keep the ‘fair and consistent process’ alive and functioning no matter the manifest anomalies.

What has become very clear to me in researching and discussing this still unfolding story around Faine is that there are two realms from which to observe and appraise it: inside the ABC, where apparently process and its survival is everything, and outside the ABC where the view can be entirely different. Read the rest of this entry »

Transcript – 774 ABC Melbourne, Mornings, Friday, 8 March 2013 08:35 AM

In ABC, John Faine Affair, NBN, Telecommunications on March 6, 2013 at 1:44 PM

Audio of Jon Faine – Stephen Conroy Interview

[audio http://blogs.abc.net.au/files/hectic-half-hour-8-3-13.mp3]

JON FAINE:
We shall turn or attention to state politics in a moment or two, but first on the federal sphere, is it true that there is now a push within the Labor Party to replace Julia Gillard and look for a Denis Napthine style option? Stephen Conroy is the Minister for Broadband Communications, the Digital Economy, Digital Productivity – this is the longest title anyone’s every had surely, and leader of the Government in the Senate. Senator Conroy good morning to you.

STEPHEN CONROY:
Yes it is a very long title. Good morning Jon.

JON FAINE:
We’ll come to the NBN and its problems in a moment, where you’re being accused of pork-barrelling, but is it true the Labor Party are looking at Simon Crean as a Denis Napthine option to replace Julia Gillard before the federal election?

STEPHEN CONROY: No.

JON FAINE:
My information is that that’s now being considered as an alternative to a Kevin Rudd push which would be electorally toxic.
STEPHEN CONROY:
Julia Gillard overwhelmingly won a vote last year for the leadership…

JON FAINE:
Long time ago now.

STEPHEN CONROY:
She retains the majority support of the Parliamentary Labor Party, and she will take us to the next election. There’s lots of stories but bottom line is, the Prime Minister has the overwhelming support of the caucus.

JON FAINE:
In the last 24 hours, since the change in leadership in Victora, it’s been put to me by figures involved in the Labor Party that this may be an option as well for resolving the predicament you find yourselves in. And Kevin Rudd, unacceptable, that would make a mockery of your procedures and processes, and Simon Crean emerges as the Denis Napthine.

STEPHEN CONROY:
Look Simon’s doing a great job travelling the country, talking about the benefits of Labor’s policies, explaining them to people in regional and rural Australia, championing the National Broadband Network, and is doing a fantastic job. But, Julia Gillard, the Prime Minister, has the overwhelming majority of caucus supporting her. And this is just further distraction to getting on with – explaining, demonstrating, and ensuring that our policies are fully understood out there in the broader community. I mean we are focused on reforming the education system, we’re focused on introducing a National Disability Insurance Scheme, and continuing the roll out of the National Broadband Network.

JON FAINE:
And yet the opinion polls show, and they’re trending in a very awkward direction, they show that none of that is getting through. And I put it to you again, Kevin Rudd, absolutely electorally unacceptable as well as internally toxic, Simon Crean the Napthine equivalent.

STEPHEN CONROY:
Look, Simon, as I said, is doing a great job. But Julia Gillard has the support of the overwhelming majority of the Parliamentary caucus. And what all of the caucus members need to focus on – is if we keep talking about ourselves, if we keep just having conversations about what’s going on in the Labor Party, we will get a response in the polls that goes down. People are not interested in hearing about the ins and outs in the Labor Party, they’re interested in hearing about how we’re going to reform the education system so that every child gets a better education; about how we’re going to ensure that one of the segments of society, families with disabled children and family members need more support; and the National Broadband Network which will open up opportunities for small business, open up opportunities…

JON FAINE:
Speaking of the Broadband Network, you’re accused of pork-barrelling with the roll out of the Broadband Network, and yet again we’re seeing western Sydney getting a disproportionate share of not just the NBN, but all infrastructure promises because of its electoral sensitivity.

STEPHEN CONROY:

Look this claim about the NBN and pork-barrelling Labor seats has been debated and disproved. But let me really precise about this, the ACCC, an independent statutory authority, intervened in the process of building the NBN. They said, following lobbying from telecommunications companies, that there will be what we call 121 points of interconnect, or POIs in the jargon. And they ticked the, you know, physical sites of these points of interconnect, and said you will start building from here. And if you overlay the map of the roll out of the NBN, it pretty much follows the instructions from the ACCC. And the ACCC are an independent statutory authority, so suggestions that there’s one electorate favoured over another are absurd.

I did want to raise one issue, John, which is starting to concern me, and I know a number of listeners, particularly to the ABC – there now seems to be a policy of trying to intimidate ABC personnel. Malcolm Turnbull is constantly attacking and trying to bully some of your journalists. And today I read in The Australian, and I know you shouldn’t always believe everything you read in The Australian, but a very disturbing thing where another journalist on the ABC staff has been internally disciplined because they’re not prepared to just accept every policy pronouncement, or claim that’s made publicly.

Now this cannot go on. These internal procedures of the ABC have to be more open and more transparent. Journalists cannot work on a basis that they’re going to be bullied and intimidated, and have complaints lodged against them in a process that is not transparent and open. This is the second…

JON FAINE:
Well now by way of background, the ABC has disciplined one of its editors, who – a man called Nick Ross who edits a forum on the ABC’s online publications, who has been critical of the Coalition. Mr Ross has been critical of the Coalition’s broadband policy, and supportive of yours. And it’s been determined by the ABC internal complaints process that his reporting has not been even-handed.

STEPHEN CONROY:

Well what – I don’t agree with all of Nick Ross’s findings, he’s not someone I’ve ever met expect for I think at press conference. I don’t agree with everything that Nick Ross writes in his columns. But what he’s been prepared to do is compare policies, now that is the job of journalists. To be prepared…

JON FAINE:
No, he’s been accused of being part of your fan club.

STEPHEN CONROY:

No he’s been prepared to compare the Labor Government’s NBN policy, and Malcolm Turnbull’s pretend NBN policy. And he’s gone to great lengths to compare all of the claims backwards and forwards, he’s been critical of me plenty of times in the past. In fact he used to be very critical to my face at press conferences. But what you see here is he’s engaged in getting the facts together, demonstrating that the claims – just by having the facts, demonstrating that the claims that Malcolm Turnbull makes about his policies, are not – don’t stand up to scrutiny. And for this he’s attacked by The Australian, he’s vilified in The Australian today, and a campaign, through a process that is non-transparent, doesn’t give people inside the ABC a fair go.

JON FAINE:
Well you’re the Minister for the ABC, if you think the process is not transparent and unfair, why don’t you do something about it?

STEPHEN CONROY:

Well I don’t run the ABC, it’s got a board, it’s got an independent charter, and it’s got a managing director. But I think it’s time to call out, where you’ve got journalists inside the ABC are being disciplined in a process that does not – does not remotely give fair justice to the journalists involved. This is just an outrageous process.

JON FAINE:
I have to return to state politics in a moment, but just one final question Senator Conroy, and we’ll see if either the ABC management or others want to comment on that, we’ll see if Mr Ross wants to comment too. But you’re a key factional warlord in Victoria for the right.

STEPHEN CONROY: [Laughs]

JON FAINE:
Who are you going to install in Gellibrand to replace Nicola Roxon?

STEPHEN CONROY:
Well I expect that the party will open its nominations in the near future. I’m sure, given it’s a very traditionally safe Labor seat, there’ll be a lot of interest, and there’ll be many nominations, and the rank and file members, as they do in most occasions in the Victorian branch of the Labor Party, get an opportunity to vote.

JON FAINE:
Yeah that’s the theory, but the practice is that you will choose who you want to install. Who have you got your eye on? Why not just tell us?

STEPHEN CONROY:
The rank and file members of the Labor Party will get nominations, and they will get an opportunity to vote on who they think will be the best representative for Gellibrand. We’ve been extraordinarily lucky in the last 20 years, we’ve had treasurers like Ralph Willis, we’ve had health ministers, and attorney-generals like Nicola Roxon. We have been very very lucky in Gellibrand to have some high quality candidates. I’m expecting a whole range of high quality people will put their hand up as well.

JON FAINE:
Are you going to offer a parachute to Senator David Feeney who’s been put into an unwinnable position on the Senate ticket in Victoria? One of those who was instrumental in the removal of Kevin Rudd.

STEPHEN CONROY:
Look, the third position in the Senate is not unwinnable, it’s challenging. David Feeney won it last time, and I’m confident David can win it again.

JON FAINE:
You’re going to leave him on the Senate ticket, or are you going to move him Gellibrand?

STEPHEN CONROY:
We’ll look for Gellibrand nomination to open, but I think David won against the odds the third Senate posi last time, and I’m confident David will be able to win from there again.

JON FAINE:
Thank you. we’ll read between the lines, and undoubtedly we’ll get the chance to speak again soon. Thank you for your time.

STEPHEN CONROY: Thanks Jon.

JON FAINE:
Senator Stephen Conroy, Victorian Labor Senator, and the Minister for the Broadband Communication, and Digital Economy portfolio in the Gillard Government.

Jack McCaw’s NBN story

In Jack McCaw, NBN on March 3, 2013 at 3:34 PM
John "Jack" McCaw

John “Jack” McCaw

By Jack McCaw (@JacketMcCaw)
March 3, 2013

Where am I?   

I live and work in regional Australia. My background is ex-military, now IT based in Armidale, NSW. The city is famous for cathedrals, the University of New England and, now, for being ‘ground zero’ for the mainland NBN.

I was involved as a Technical Lead during a new network rollout for the University of New England in 2009, and saw first hand the difference a ubiquitous, fibre-backed network was making to productivity. Obviously, when NBNco announced Armidale was going to be the first site, I was happy.

How did it all start?

I began to monitor the approach of the NBN to Armidale, starting a thread on the very popular Whirlpool forums Sep 3rd, 2010 to track it:

http://forums.whirlpool.net.au/forum-replies.cfm?t=1526063

I watched as it drew nearer to my place – I watched the NBN ‘switch-on’. There were dinner parties where a new NBN connection would be unveiled and we would all look at the pretty blinking lights and speed tests. I wasn’t happy with how long it would take for the NBN to reach me. So we moved.

Skymesh was the first company to have a flyer in my letterbox at the new house, offering a 2 month free trial. I couldn’t knock that back.

I had done my research on location and layout of the building and focussed on making it as easy for them as possible. On the day of the installation my partner was set to handle it while I was at work in Sydney. She surprised him by being fully conversant with things like NTD, fibre run and power requirements – don’t mess with a gamer girl when it comes to HER getting fibre!

The installer was happy with Plan A; lights came on and blinked. I had NBN! Excited speedtests commenced and for a few days life was a hectic blur of speedtests, downloads, uploads and media consumption.

What went wrong?

Then the NBN lights went out, so a support call to Skymesh went in. To have NBN and then not have it – junkie type withdrawal symptoms! Now I had the opportunity to test the interface between customer/RSP/NBNco at a service delivery level.

Potentially I was staring at weeks without NBN connection while sub-contractors were re-tasked to fault find. However thanks to Whirlpool and a very pro-active team from both Skymesh and NBNco this was not the case. The result was a rapid fix and follow-up to streamline the procedure.  Smooth, and the offending piece of fibre was replaced.

What’s life with the NBN like ?

I have a main desktop beast, a rack-mounted Xeon server and a media computer in the lounge room. My partner is studying fulltime via on-line on her laptop whilst being an artist who runs her business on-line, so we are pretty heavy internet users.  Now, we do things differently.

We consume media almost entirely by streaming. We communicate via Skype and Voip more often than we would otherwise, as the price barrier is just not there – so family and friends are happier. There is no conflict between her streaming in the lounge room and me working in the ‘cave’, so we just no longer think about ‘internet’ – we just do things.

Plan; Skymesh 100/40 2 Terabytes/month ($115)

Hardware supplied; NetgearWNR3500L

Read more:

Tony Abbott’s scripted lies about #NBN costs by @zackster

Why Murdoch’s media is gunning for your NBN by @sortius